Steve Murley Steps Down as Superintendent

Romey Angerer Sueppel, Reporter

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After 21 years of service, the superintendent of the Iowa City Community School District, Steve Murley, will be leaving his job. His previous contract expires in 2021 and Murley has chosen to not renew it.

“I asked the board not to renew the contract this time, because I’m planning on transitioning at the end of that time frame. I wanted to make sure that they were aware and that the community was aware so we could start planning for next step,” Murley said.     

Murley explained his reasons for leaving the position he had held for so long.

“My middle child graduated from college here in Iowa, so from a family perspective it’s a good time to retire, but more importantly I think it’s a good time for transitions,” Murley said.

Murley also talked about his accomplishments, such as constructing Liberty High School and the gym renovations at City, both of which he  conducted.

“We’re three years ahead on our facilities master plan. The last set of projects are either underway or will break ground this spring and bringing that home and getting that work done is just a huge gift to the community,” Murley said.

Both of the projects are part of Murley’s ten-year plan to improve the school district. Murley also talked about what he would continue to do in the remaining years until he retires.

“Anytime you have facilities that don’t meet your kids’ needs or your staff needs, rather than being invisible, they then become an impediment to learning, whether it’s [students] sweating in the fall and in the spring when it’s too hot at City High or whether there are not enough classrooms available,” Murley said.

Murley expressed his gratitude to the staff who he has worked with and the students he worked to help.

“The hardest thing I’ve ever done in my career was telling people that I was going to step away. I mean, you know you have an impact on people, but you don’t necessarily know what that impact is. People don’t walk around and tell everybody the impact that each other has on one another,” Murley said.