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The student news site of Iowa City High School

The Little Hawk

The student news site of Iowa City High School

The Little Hawk

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Rito Perez
Rito Perez
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LH Album Review: Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana

Trap Bunny is back! Bad Bunny has finally returned with his long awaited album, Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana
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Wisdom Konu

Seven years ago, Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio was bagging groceries at his local supermarket in the small town of Almirante Sur in northern Puerto Rico. During his time working there, he started publishing one or two songs here and there on Soundcloud by his artist name, Bad Bunny; until, out of nowhere, he exploded onto the latin music scene. Today, he is the artist with the most streamed album on Spotify. Last year’s Un Verano Sin Ti, became one the most streamed album on Spotify and catapulted Bad Bunny’s name in the Latin music scene, and made him one of the biggest artists in the world. In fact, he is the first artist to be Spotify’s #1 Global Artist for three years in a row (2020-2022). After teasing the world with the possibility of a new album, saying “no one knows if it will be this year or next,” Bad Bunny finally dropped Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana, which translates to “No one knows what will happen tomorrow.”

The album opens with the song NADIE SABE, which is arguably the most majestic intro song of all time. NADIE SABE is addressed to both his fans and his haters. In it, he also states that the point of this album was not to get a billion streams or to be the most popular album in the world, but to make his real fans happy. The song ends with the orchestra building up dramatically to him singing the phrase “No one knows what will happen tomorrow, that’s why I do it today.” 

After the orchestra in NADIE SABE fades out, the next song, MONACO, starts playing. The song begins with violins playing a beautiful melody, reflecting the high-class vibes the song attempts to portray. The violins then slow down and the main trap beat of the song starts. In the song, Bad Bunny claps back repeatedly at other latin artists who diss him in their songs. Some of these verses include when he says, “That’s why you’re 101 in the top 100 and I’m first,” and, “They don’t even know you in your own hood / yesterday I was with LeBron and also with DiCaprio.” With its trap rhythm and aggressive lyrics, MONACO lays out the theme for the rest of the album, demonstrating its shift away from the pop and reggaeton of Bad Bunny’s last album, Un Verano Sin Ti and towards the less mainstream trap music of his early career.

This theme continues with the next song in the album, FINA, a long awaited collaboration with Young Miko. Young Miko is a young female trap/reggaeton artist from Añasco, Puerto Rico, who in the last year has blown up onto the Latin music scene. The song hooks the listener with a sample from Because of you by Young Prophet, which is quickly interrupted by the song’s trap beat and Young Miko’s immaculate verse. What makes this song so special is Young Miko’s unique and refreshing flow. In the male-dominated field of trap artists, Young Miko’s flow is not only new, but incredibly different to every other artist in her field. Once her verse ends, a sample from Pa’ que retozen by Tego Calderon, a classic reggaeton song from 2004, serves as an interlude before Bad Bunny begins his verse, which, like all his verses, is a masterpiece.

The album continues following the trap theme for the most part with a few exceptions, such as Hibiki, featuring pop artist Mora, and Where She Goes, a very catchy spanglish song with a Jersey Club beat. Tracks 4-18 are more trap songs, some of which are underwhelming; such as VOU 787, Seda, featuring Bryant Myers, MERCEDES CAROTA, featuring YOVNGCHIMI, and, NO ME QUIERO CASAR. Unlike the rest of the songs of the album they simply aren’t as catchy or exciting, and they fail to deliver the adrenaline that rhythmic, bass heavy trap songs usually have. Other than those couple, however, the rest of the tracks are total bangers, with some great features from Puerto Rico’s best trap artists, such as Luar La L and Eladio Carrión.

For many, the highlights of the album are the last 4 tracks. Track 19 is possibly the most anticipated collab in the Latin music genre: PERRO NEGRO featuring the incredibly popular Columbian reggaeton artist Feid. This track is the only new reggaeton track on the album, and it is fantastic. Feid and Bad Bunny never fail at making reggaeton songs by themselves; put them together and you get an absolute masterpiece.

PERRO NEGRO, is followed by an interlude titled EUROPA 🙁 and then immediately leads to the penultimate song of the album, ACHO PR. This last song, featuring Ñengo Flow, De La Ghetto, and Arcángel, is the perfect way to end the album. In the song, Bad Bunny pays homage to early trap artists, including the three featured, while also paying homage to their home and the home of trap: Puerto Rico. The song’s title literally means, “PR, bro,” (PR standing for Puerto Rico).

The album then ends with a song that was released before the actual album, titled UN PREVIEW. The song itself is incredibly catchy and entertaining, with a very classic reggaeton beat. What is interesting about this song, however, is the title, UN PREVIEW. Before the actual beat even comes on, Bad Bunny says “Come here, I’m gonna play something, I’m gonna play a preview of what’s coming later.” It is pretty clear that Bad Bunny is hinting at his next album, possibly more reggaeton centered, like Un Verano Sin Ti.

Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana is, by itself, a fantastic album. However, what it represents, especially to Puerto Ricans, is what makes it so special. Puerto Rico is a small, struggling island of a little over 3 million people, accounting for only .4% of the population of Latin America. Despite this, some of the biggest artists in the Latin music genre: Rauw Alejandro, Daddy Yankee, Farruko, Young Miko, Bad Bunny, and so many more are all from that small, beautiful island. Puerto Ricans are proud of who they are. Hearing references to their island in some of the most popular music in the world, being home to the biggest name in the Latin music genre and one of the biggest names in music in the world, and hearing their accent and their slang in pop culture kindle a sense of pride incomparable to any in the world. 

Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana may have some songs that many, including me, may skip. However, it is still a phenomenal album. I would encourage people interested in the Latin music genre to start with Bad Bunny’s last album, Un Verano Sin Ti, since it has a wider appeal. Bad Bunny said that Nadie Sabe Lo Que Va a Pasar Mañana would be an album for his most loyal and dedicated fans, and he was not wrong. As one of Bad Bunny’s self-proclaimed loyal and dedicated fans, I give this album a 9/10.

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Wisdom Konu, Executive Editor and Culture Co-Editor
at city im like princess diana
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